WEEK 5 [in class]


Assessment for chapters 6+8 Assessment

Theory to Practice in situ


A seminal paper written by Peggy McIntosh "Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" (looks at White privilege)

[MONDAY GROUP READING ASSIGNMENTS]


Ch. 3: Critical ?s
Ch. 4: Cultural Collision
Ch. 5: Media Infl.
Ch. 6: Family
Ch. 8: Comm.
Ch. 11: Achievement
Robert G.
Julie F.
Amy C.
Hera B.
Sara D.
Karen C.
Matt M.
Joe G.
Michael D.
Marissa C.
Leanne D.
Emily K.
Catherine T.
Christina G.
Marina E.
Adele L.
Daryl K.
John L.
Tim U.
Sarah N.
Sarah G.
Rachel R.
Laura T.
Joe O.

Sarah R.
Josh K.
Elizabeth S.

Lauren Z.

[NOTE: EVERYONE GOT THEIR 1ST OR 2ND CHOICE, HOWEVER IF YOU ARE UNSATISFIED W/ YOUR READING ASSIGNMENT YOU CAN CERTAINLY NEGOTIATE A SWAP WITH ONE OF YOUR COLLEAGUES. UPDATE THE SPREADSHEET AT WILL, BUT KEEP THE GROUPS TO 4-5 PEOPLE (NO MORE-NO LESS). CHECK THE WEEKLY READ & WRITE PAGE ON WED FOR THE REST OF THE ASSIGNMENT.]- GNA GNA Jun 22, 2009





WEEK FOUR [artifacts]


*
(Re)visioning of Week 3 assignment: Sarah Nitti, Leanne Drapeau, Sarah Dagon, Daryl Kagan


Suggestions for Future Teachers

1. While you are forming your instructional design recognize students “School” schema and plan accordingly.

2. When you’ve completed it, ask yourself if it as clear as possible
a. How is this presented?
b. How does it facilitate understanding for all types of students?
c. What kind of scaffolding have you provided? (Word choice, numbered steps, check list for tasks, diagrams, examples)

3. Have an objective third party review the assignment and get feedback.
a. Is the assignment clear to you?
b. Do you think you would be able to successfully execute the assignment?

4. When presenting to the students, allow time for students to ask for clarification or suggest modifiers.
a. What is the general consensus on the assignment?
b. Why?
c. Were the student reactions varied?

Summary of Recommendations:


While critiquing the homework assignment:
In our data collection we noticed that a major problem was lack of understanding of the actual homework assignment. To avoid this, we would propose alternative examples to the ones provided in the instructions. For example, showing concrete examples. This could be achieved by providing a link to a completed example of the assignment. This will not clutter the instructions and will allow students to choose whether or not they want to look at the examples.

Consider presenting the assignment in the form of an outline, perhaps with one color of ink. We noticed that some students had an aversion to the different colors and found it distracting.

In terms of the in class assignment of revising the homework:

*Students that were paired together to work on the homework had confusion about which student did the assignment correctly and which student needed to redo a portion of the homework.

While the students knew they had to build consensus about the homework through collaborative learning, the video about the math students building consensus was not helpful because in a math homework assignment the answer is either right or wrong. With the speculation homework from week 3 students could not build consensus because they did not know which assignment was done correctly.

A suggestion to revise this assignment for the future is to provide scaffolded questions to refer to while working collaboratively. These questions would be a restatement of the instructions, for example:
1) Do your speculations provide evidence from at least three videos?
2) Do your speculations include evidence from at least one text?
3) Do you provide 2 examples for practical application in teaching per speculation?
4) Do you address at least one type of development per speculation?

http://www.box.net/shared/7mv0a5lqgr [ppt overview of ethnic/cultural identity dev.]

[A comparison of the theories of Piaget, Vygotzsky, and Jerrid Kruse].


WEEK FOUR [in class]


Resource for pairs working on consensus building through collaborative learning.




Task(s) & Deliverable(s): Your task is to work towards consensus building by redirecting, correcting, and augmenting the format and content of your WK3 Read & Write. Both team members will resubmit your WK3 Read & Write with any as-needed revisions. In addition, each member of your team will create one additional speculation based on the compilation of both members' data. Work together using the T2P worksheet as a scaffold. When you complete your work together join one of the other three groups.



Resources for teams working on (1) ethnic/cultural identity development & (2) White identity development.



Deliverables:

  1. PPT presentation summarizing key points of your assigned developmental theory (10 minutes = 10-12 slides)
  2. Using the case, "What's the big problema?" to ground your theory into practice (ethnic/cultural identity devleopment team examine the students' status; White identity development team examine Erik's status), prepare questions to lead us in a large group discussion (T2P authentic assessment) (15 mins.)

Inquiry questions (actions) for team working on (re)visioning WK3 Read & Write and "TV Time" activity.

  • Conduct some participant-observation of the pairs working on consensus building.
  • Collect and summarize feedback of colleagues.
  • Check out wiki discussion boards for clues.
  • Research best practices for assessing viability of homework and lessons (different for adult learners?)
  • Identify "what worked" that should remain.
  • Identify what can be tweaked and what should be eliminated.
  • Interview the instructor about pedagogical and/or instructional goals & intentions.
  • Interview students about satisfaction, learning, etc.

Deliverable: Your team will (1) provide a summary of recommendations for both portions of the week 3 curriculum (HW and in class work), and (2) provide your classmates with a set of guidelines to employ when they perform similar evaluations of their own instructional design in the future. Your artifact should take the form you believe will best convey the various ideas, opinions, perceptions, and experiences you gather through research. Cite any rubrics or resources you use to guide your research and recommendations. Be prepared to make a brief (15 minute w/ Q&A) presentation to your colleagues.



Inquiry questions (actions) for team formulating critiques and identifying potential vacancies in developmental/learning theories.

Check out this web page I found and annotated. [scroll down and look for highlighted text and post it notes on the page] You may find it provides a way to frame your critique.

  • Collect and summarize critiques from classmates
  • Choose two or three of the most popularly cited theories/theorists (from WK4 Read & Write) for your research
  • Depend upon your critical thinking and analysis to create a framework (list of questions you will use to examine each theories) for critique
  • Conduct scholarly research to augment/evidence the critiques presented by your classmates (including yourselves)

Deliverable: Your team will provide (1) a list of questions to guide us in our future critiques of developmental/learning theory, and (2) a summary of critiques and identify potential vacancies in the developmental/learning theories you've determined to be most relevant to your colleagues (covered in class and in the readings thus far). Your artifact should take the form you believe will best convey the various ideas, opinions, perceptions, and experiences you gather through research. Cite any rubrics or resources you use to guide your research. Be prepared to make a brief (15 minute w/ Q&A) presentation to your colleagues.




WEEK THREE

- GNA GNA Jun 17, 2009 WOW! I spent about 5 hours today battling technology to get the videos transferred from the tape to a usable format and length to YouTube. In the process I lost the cool titles and transitions I put in...so that was cool [by cool I mean Not Cool]. I now know, more than ever, why teachers refuse to engage with this type of technology. If I had a life, I would've given up 4 hours ago... good news for us, I am here to protect and serve for the next 3 weeks... so without further ado...this week's wonderful artifacts! Of course we will add the National GEO group's video next week!





LEARNING THEORIES (RESOURCES)


http://tip.psychology.org/theories.html

http://www.learning-theories.com/

http://www.learnativity.com/edpsych.html

DEVELOPMENTAL THEORIES (RESOURCES)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_stage_theories

http://www.geocities.com/psychtheory/lifespan.html


KEY PLAYERS (some)


  • Jean Piaget
  • Lev Vygotsky
  • Erik Erikson
  • Jean Phinney
  • Urie Bronfenbrenner
  • Carol Gilligan
  • Nel Noddings
  • Janet E. Helms
  • L. Kohlberg
  • A. Bandura
  • A. Maslow
  • P. Freiere
  • (add more)





WEEK TWO ARTIFACTS [- GNA GNA Jun 14, 2009 Excellent work everyone. You are all on point here.]

Learner Differences Presentations


TOPIC: "Millennial" students (podcast) [Solid podcast folks. We'd like to see your resources.]


http://www.box.net/shared/mtavxshomt

TOPIC: ADHD


adhd.jpg

Resources:

"ADHD Diagnosis and Treatment Require Grappling With "Zone of Ambiguity" and Incomplete Facts,"
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/136260.php. Accessed 9 June 2009.

http://kidsandadhd.blogspot. com/

http://www.cehl.org/ pediatriciansadhd.shtml

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/ health/publications/attention- deficit-hyperactivity- disorder/complete-index.shtml

"NIMH, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD),"
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml.
Accessed 9 June 2009.

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/ 08/19/health/children/19RITA. html?ex=999244294&ei=1&en= 67892abd547ea5ef&pagewanted=2

http://psychcentral.com/news/ 2007/09/06/childhood- television-watching- correlated-to-later-attention- problems/1238.html

http://www.as.wvu.edu/~scidis/ add.html
http://www.helpguide.org/ mental/adhd_add_teaching_ strategies.htm
http://www.cignabehavioral. com/web/basicsite/consumer/ educationAndResourceCenter/ adhdDiagnosisAndTreatmentNIMH. pdf.

TOPIC: Mild disability


deaf.JPG

These are the URL's we used:

www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=63779891121&topic=8447, www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/hq9806.html, www.listen-up.org/edu/options1.html, www.ed.gov www.ablesea.com, https://vpn.uconn.edu/cgi/reprint/1/1/,DanaInfo=jdsde.oxfordjournals.org+52 [Article entitled 'The Social Adjustment of Deaf Adolescents in Segregated, Partially Integrated, and Mainstreamed Settings.'] http: www.deafau.org.au/info/policy_media.php http://www.hollywoodoutbreak.com/2009/05/11/tom-malloy-avoiding-deaf-stereotypes/


TOPIC: Ethic/Cultural identity


Joe Goldman, Josh Kelly, Leanne Drapeau, Laura Tuneski: WK2M_JG_LD_JK_LT.jpgPhoto_4.jpg


TOPIC: Gifted & Talented (PPT)




TOPIC: Student with a single parent, living in poverty


Definition:// Ronnie deals with class struggles and poverty because his father is out of work and is a single parent. He also deals with being and only child.

Research:


Scholarly: “Can Men "Mother"? Life as a Single Father” by Barbara J. Risman looks at the issue of whether or not men can fulfill the role of a mother in a single parent household. The author concludes that a man can take on the role of a mother and succeed at providing a proper home environment for a child. Therefore the gender of the single parent does not play as large a role in the development of a child in a single-parent family as was initially suspected.
Source Jstor

Educators:


Ron Howard Story on "How to Teach Properly"


Mass Media:

“Single-Parent Homes: The Effect on Schooling” from The New York Times looks at the relationship between single-parent homes and schooling. The article revels that students, especially boys are more likely to drop out of school. It then goes on to reveal that boys in single-parent homes are more likely to drop out of school if they have brothers and sisters. The more siblings, the more likely the boy is to drop out of school.
Source NYTimes

Speculations
:

Negative Effects:
  • motivation affected by access to resources
  • poor self esteem from less affluent family
  • self worth affected
  • personal attention, emotional attention, difficulties with social interaction
  • learned helplessness, feeling stuck in the situation
  • possibility of dropping out to work instead of going to school

Positive Effects:
  • positive or high self esteem since the parent is able to focus on only child and provide for that child
  • motivation to learn- resilience in poverty to get out or better living situation
  • family values education in a single parent home

Theory to Practice:

The teacher could:
  • -allow the student to work independently
  • -sympathetic toward student when working in groups
  • -be more aware or social practices or situations in single family homes
  • -reach out to single parents, read and research poverty and effects on children
  • -one on one with the teacher and student, get parent involved




- GNA GNA Jun 3, 2009

I've gone over the interest surveys you completed and have some news to report.


Over the next five weeks we will be investigating (in order of your preferences, but not necessarily in the order they will be incorporated into our curriculum [n=28]):

Psychological development (34 points)
Issues of collaboration and a caring learning community (31 points)
Problem finding and solving during teaching (25 points)
Learner differences (culture, identity, etc.) (23 points)
Issues of multiculturalism and equity (17 points)

The two topics you collectively have the Least interest pursuing are:

Physiological development (4 points)
Historical theories of development and learning (6 points)




WEEK ONE ARTIFACTS



Concept Maps of "Learning" (created by groups of four)




Week_1_for_WIKI.jpg
Rachel Rodziewicz, Beth Skudzienski, Amy Callahan, & Laura Tuneski
- Sarah D, Joe G, Joe, Hera


gna.png
Marina, Tim, Emily and Sarah


Week1_Mon_ConceptMap1.jpg

Week1_Mon_ConceptMap2.jpg

Week1_Mon_ConceptMap3.jpg

Week1_Mon_ConceptMap4.jpg